‘COLONEL’ WHO ORDERED BEATING DIDN’T WANT MAN TO DIE, TRIAL TOLD

Ms. Page’s client was charged with first-degree murder. Three Crown witnesses testified they had been ordered by the client to kill the victim. In his statement to police, the client admitted to ordering the others to beat and confine the victim, but insisted that he did not intend for him to die.

After 2 days of deliberating, Ms. Page convinced the jury that the client was not guilty of first-degree murder, and instead a verdict of second-degree murder was entered, thereby avoiding a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment.


 
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SELF-STYLED ‘COLONEL’ AND ‘CAPTAIN’ GUILTY IN BEATING DEATH
By: Peter Small
First Posted: Saturday November 27, 2010
Source: Toronto Star
» PDF of Toronto Star Article: SELF-STYLED ‘COLONEL’…

A jury has convicted a self-styled colonel and his so-called captain in the savage beating death of an armed car robber at an east Toronto movie trailer yard two years ago.

“Colonel” Richard Sheridan, 49, and “Captain” Chad Noureddine, 30, were found guilty of second-degree murder. They had both been charged with first-degree murder.

They return to court for sentencing Dec. 15.

The jury of seven women and five men began their deliberations Thursday afternoon after being charged by Ontario Superior Court Justice Eugene Ewaschuk and came back with their verdict Saturday.

The slaying occurred in the Don Yard, a sprawling parking lot for movie set trailers and industrial waste bins at Lake Shore Blvd. E. and Cherry St. on Aug. 22, 2008.

André “Red” Pelliccione, a drifter and crack addict, had come to the yard to see its absent owner, Frank Eldridge, but was summarily ordered off the property by Sheridan.

Pelliccione in turn vowed he would kill Sheridan, who then ordered the confinement and beating.

In 1995, Pelliccione, 42, had played a phony cop and took part in an infamous $3.1 million Loomis armed car robbery in Etobicoke, for which he had recently finished serving time when he visited the Don Yard.

Sheridan took care of security in the yard in return for living in a recreational vehicle on site. He had a ragtag crew of crack addicts under him who worked in return for drugs.

Sheridan insisted on being addressed as Colonel, and he conferred military titles on his underlings.

Three of his other former subordinates — Jennifer Dunsford, Bryan Smith and Michelle Sterling — are in jail after having pleaded guilty to manslaughter in Pelliccione’s death and have testified for the Crown.

The three witnesses told the jury that, on Sheridan’s orders, all five kicked and punched Pelliccione and smashed his head with large rocks as he begged to be let go.

They finally administered the coup de grace in a blood spattered trailer, they said.

Sheridan bullied the group into joining the beating or face becoming victims themselves, the three witnesses testified.

Sheridan himself gave a similar version to police, prosecutors Darren Hogan and Jessica Joy Smith contended. He admitted he told his crew that “‘Everyone has to be a part of it,’” Hogan told the jury.

Noureddine also took an enthusiastic role in the beating, Hogan said. When Sheridan ordered him to hit the victim with a rock, “he doesn’t simply drop a rock but smashes a rock into André Pelliccione’s head at full force,” Hogan added.

But Sheridan’s lawyers, Alana Page and Peter Bawden, argued that rather than wanting to kill Pelliccione, their client was actually desperately trying to think of a way to save his life despite the man having threatened his.

Afraid for his safety, Sheridan ordered his underlings to confine and beat the intruder. But he was trying to buy time to save Pelliccione while at the same time avoiding the man’s eventual retaliation, Page argued.

Noureddine’s lawyers, Victor Giourgas and Marco Sciarra, took the position that the three star Crown witnesses give inconsistent, often false statements, and that the evidence against their client was so weak as to be virtually nonexistent.


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‘COLONEL’ WHO ORDERED BEATING DIDN’T WANT MAN TO DIE, TRIAL TOLD
By: Peter Small
First Posted: Tuesday November 23, 2010
Source: Toronto Star
» PDF of Toronto Star Article: ‘COLONEL’ WHO…

A self-styled colonel who ordered the ultimately fatal beating of an infamous armed car robber was actually desperately trying to think of a way to save his life, his lawyer says.

Even in his self-incriminating statement to police, Richard Sheridan made it clear he did not mean for Andre Pelliccione to die, defence lawyer Alana Page argued in her final submissions Tuesday.

Sheridan, 49, and Chad Noureddine, 30, are on trial for first-degree murder in the prolonged, savage beating of Pelliccione on Aug. 22, 2008, at the Don Yard, a sprawling parking lot for waste bins and movie trailers at Lake Shore Blvd. E. and Cherry St.

Page urged the jury to find Sheridan guilty of manslaughter, not murder.

Sheridan was in charge of security at the lot, working for the right to live in a recreational vehicle parked there.

He insisted on being addressed as colonel and conferred military titles on the crack addicts who helped him take care of the property.

He dubbed Noureddine a captain.

Three of the former underlings — Jennifer Dunsford, Bryan Smith and Michelle Sterling — have already pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the slaying and have testified for the Crown.

Page said that when Pelliccione — who had recently finished serving time for his part in an infamous Loomis armed car robbery — visited the yard unannounced, he threatened to kill Sheridan after being ordered to leave.

Once threatened with death, Sheridan felt he had no choice but to respond, Page said. He had his underlings confine and beat Pelliccione, but didn’t want him killed, she said.

Sheridan was trying to figure out a way of keeping the intruder alive while ensuring he himself would not be killed, she said. “Mr. Sheridan is buying time. He is trying to find a way out.”

Noureddine’s lawyer, Victor Giourgas, urged the jury to acquit his client, arguing that the three star Crown witnesses who claim he smashed the victim with rocks gave inconsistent, often false statements.

“The evidence against Mr. Noureddine is so frail, contradictory as to amount to no evidence,” Giourgas told the jurors.

Justice Eugene Ewaschuk will charge the jury on Thursday.


 

MARI LOEWENNEWS